Digital Media In South Korea

1405 Words6 Pages
Ever since its concept was first conceived, the media has always had a tremendous influence in our life, with or without our awareness. The media is ever-growing and has always been evolving alongside with humanity as it is the result of society’s intellect. Since the late 20th century, with the creation of the Internet and ICT, the facade of the media has been changed fundamentally and has also created a completely new lifestyle that has never existed before. The new form of today’s Internet-based media is called digital media and is making a considerable impact to millennials all over the world. In Asia today, digital media is an inseparable part of young people’s daily life. However, there is one Asian country that has taken digital media…show more content…
In fact, the country is among the leading nations in the massive wave of new technology and media that is sweeping through the world. South Korea has long become the most wired country in Asia, with seventy percent of its fifty million people owning a smartphone, the highest penetration rate in the world, thanks to the government’s effort of mass funding the IT industry decades ago. Yet, that is not to also mention one of the fastest and most penetrated Internet in the world, let alone Asia. In 2007, before the widespread of smartphones, about seventy percent of Korea 's population were already using the Internet on a daily basis, with people under thirty making up most of the figure, with the usage ratio of ninety nine percent (Ok 2011). With such impressive statistics, one could just imagine how influential the media must be to South Koreans and how dominant the new media is specifically to the young…show more content…
Despite the fact that mobile devices emphasize individuality, online communities play a great role in the life of new media consumers. These communities resembles real life communities but are more versatile and constant. Since the early 2000s, there have been domestic social networking sites in Korea that resembles Facebook and Twitter, mostly for alumni and colleagues to find and interact with each other. The model has then become a huge phenomenon that helped transform the Korea 's youth culture. In particular, Korean youth are very active in shared-interest communities, as they are the main source of active knowledge building and informal learning by diverse leisure activities (Ok 2011). Furthermore, these communities gives socially awkward people the feeling of being included and verified. In other words, human always need to be involved in communities, the only difference now is that they do not need to get out of their house to be in those
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