Disability Case Managers Role

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It is recognised that people with intellectual disabilities have the same sexual needs and desires as persons without an intellectual disability (Mitchell & Butler, 1978). Disability Case Managers play a critical role in supporting people with intellectual disabilities on the journey to becoming sexually active, and potentially a parent. From a Disability Case Management perspective, this means they need to be a facilitator of discussion about sexual health, as well as be able to provide an unbiased recommendation of what should happen, and the supports that should be allocated (Brantlinger, 1983; Trudel & Desjardins, 1992; Murray & Minnes, 1994). This article will focus on the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities through pre-…show more content…
o As seen from earlier research a large proportion of service workers have negative attitudes to people with disabilities being involved in sexual relationships, and giving birth and taking care of children (Mitchell & Butler, 1978; Aunos & Feldman, 2002; Mayes, Llewelyn, & McConnell, 2007). These biases have the potential to influence this inherently fragile group into rash decisions. • Constructing and maintaining strong relationships. o As recognised by Mayes, Llewellyn and McConnell (2007) “mothering is best understood as a deeply embedded social occupation”, meaning the mothers giving birth, and caring for the child, often make decisions with the assistance of people they perceive they have a strong, meaningful relationship…show more content…
It is clear from the literature that the community needs to start viewing people with intellectual disabilities as sexual beings, with the same rights as everyone else, not some asexual object which requires sterilisation (Bass, 1963; Hillier, Johnson, & Harrision, 2002; Pfeiffer, 1994; Aunos & Feldman, 2002). As professionals trying to support people with intellectual disabilities, it has been suggested by literature that you need to maintain an open mind, and foster a positive attitude to assist this group efficiently and effectively (Aunos & Feldman, 2002; Mayes, Llewelyn, & McConnell, 2007; Mitchell & Butler, 1978). The pre- and post-natal care of a child, as well as supporting persons with varying intellectual or physical disabilities, by all accounts looks like an incredibly hard task, yet as a Disability Case Manager it is your job to create goals, manage resources and implement plans, to ensure the needs and best interests of your clients are, to the best of your ability, met (Meppelder, Hodes, Kef, & Schuengel,
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