Disadvantages Of Waste Water

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Sewage is a mixture of wastes, both domestic and industrial in the form of solution or suspension. It is also called municipal water or wastewater. It consists of nearly 99% water along with pathogenic bacteria, suspended solids and ions. It is released in water bodies like lakes or streams and there is a need to ensure the proper treatment of these wastes in order to prevent water pollution and related diseases. Sewage is derieved from the latin word ‘exaquare’ meaning ‘to drain out(water or other liquid substances)’ Waste water usually consists of dirty water from showers, dishwashers, toilets etc. which include human waste, soaps, detergents and other harmful microbes and non-biodegradable substances which harm the environment over time…show more content…
Ozone is very unstable and reactive and oxidizes most organic material it comes in contact with, thereby destroying many pathogenic microorganisms. Ozone is considered to be safer than chlorine because, unlike chlorine which has to be stored on site (highly poisonous in the event of an accidental release), ozone is generated on-site as needed. Ozonation also produces fewer disinfection by-products than chlorination. A disadvantage of ozone disinfection is the high cost of the ozone generation equipment and the requirements for special…show more content…
A phytoplankton study found high nutrient concentrations linked to sewage effluents. High nutrient concentration leads to high chlorophyll a concentrations, which is a proxy for primary production in marine environments. High primary production means phytoplankton populations and most likely high zooplankton populations, because zooplankton feed on phytoplankton. However, effluent released into marine systems also leads to greater population instability. The planktonic trends of high populations close to input of treated sewage is contrasted by the bacterial trend. In a study of Aeromonas spp. in increasing distance form a wastewater source, greater change in seasonal cycles was found the furthest from the effluent. This trend is so strong that the furthest location studied actually had an inversion of the Aeromonas spp. cycle in comparison to that of fecal coliforms. Since there is a main pattern in the cycles that occurred simultaneously at all stations it indicates seasonal factors (temperature, solar radiation, phytoplankton) control of the bacterial population. The effluent dominant species changes from Aeromonas caviae in winter to Aeromonas sobria in the spring and the fall while the inflow dominant species is Aeromonas caviae, which is constant throughout the
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