Discourse In Discourse

1271 Words6 Pages
According to Fairclough (2001) nobody who has an interest in modern society, and surely nobody who has an interest in relationships of power in modern society, can afford to ignore language. As Fairclough (2001) expresses” many people with precisely such interests have believed they could safely ignore language. He posits that, this may not be surprising, because the general level of attention and sensitivity to language has been sorrily inadequate, and in particular the teaching of language has to a remarkable extent contrived to ignore its most decisive social functions. Moreover, this cannot be blamed on the teachers, because this is also true in most of the academic work on language which the teachers have been offered as models. According…show more content…
As Richardson (2007) explains, researchers who adopt this definition of discourse ‘assume that language is used to mean something and to do something’ and that this ‘meaning and doing’ is linked to the context of its usage. This view of language as action and social behaviour is emphasized in CDA, which sees discourse – the use of language in speech and writing – as a form of social practice (Van Dijk, 2011). Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) is ‘a theory and method analysing the way that individuals and institutions use language’ (Richardson, 2007). Critical discourse analysts focus on ‘relations between discourse, dominance, and social inequality’ (Van Dijk, 1993) and how discourse (re)creates and maintains these relations of dominance and inequality’. Due to their concern with the analysis of the ‘often opaque relationships’ between discourse practices and wider social and cultural structures, CDA practitioners take an ‘obvious socio-political stance’ (Richardson, 2007). CDA therefore addresses broader social issues and attends to external factors, including, power, ideology, inequality,…show more content…
As Fairclough (1995) expresses, ideology is ‘meaning in the service of power’. According to Wodak (2003) critical discourse analysts see ideologies as serving the interests of certain groups with social power, ensuring that events and behaviors come to be regarded as legitimate and common-sense. As Wodak (2003) posits, ideologies do this, because they inform the way people interpret the world around
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