Workplace Discrimination Case Study

801 Words4 Pages
Discrimination has become a major issue in the workplace and sometimes difficult to pinpoint discriminative acts. Discrimination acts range from biasness in the promotion, hiring, assignment of duties, compensation, the method of termination, retaliation, various forms of harassment, and so forth. However, Americans can comfortably rely on some federal laws that serve to counter discrimination at the workplace. Throughout the hiring and the termination process, it is important that the employees become aware of the appropriate process to keep off from acts of discrimination. , in this case, John is an employee of the private entity that goes against the principles of the current law relating to discrimination. As such, John has decided to file…show more content…
There are certain steps that John needs to follow to file a discrimination complaint against the organization. Notably, if an employee feels that he or she has been subjected to discrimination, they are entitled to file a complaint or file a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) (Eeoc.gov, 2010). In accordance with the guidelines, the offended party should submit the claim within at most 180 days from the occurrence of the occurrence event. This would need him to fill out an intake questionnaire and submit it to the EEOC agents or their offices. On the other hand, John has an option of filing the claim online. After the complainant files the complaint with the Commission, the EEOC should make a point of serving the employer within ten days’ notice to make them aware of the existence of the charge. If the case appears strong or rather very complicated, the employer and the complainant will be issued with a mediation offer so that they can try and settle their issues outside the court…show more content…
At this level, the EEOC investigates the company in question, talk to the witnesses, and also examine the record to identify whether there are reasonable grounds for the employee to bring a case against the employer. When the EEOC finds out that there are reasonable grounds to do so, the employee has awarded the right sue the employer on the grounds of discrimination. Notably, the complainant is given 90 days to after getting the go-ahead to sue the employer. However, if there is no reconciliation that is reached, the EEOC has an option of filing the case with a federal district court. It is important to note that most cases filed by the EEOC have a very high success rate and raises more if the cases follow the appeal
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