Discrimination In Harlem Renaissance

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In the beginning of the 1900s, racism and discrimination were extremely prevalent. This issue was even more apparent in the South due to the Jim Crow laws that allowed segregation and violence against Black citizens. Because of this, “The Great Migration” occurred and many African Americans began to move to northern cities. This event was a precursor to The Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was a time of expression and revitalization of African American music, art, dance, literature, and much more. Focused in the neighborhood of Harlem in New York, it spanned from the beginnings of the 1910s to the early 1930s. During a time when there was much discrimination against Black Americans, The Harlem Renaissance was a watershed moment in …show more content…

Black Artists worked hard to put an end to that. Though there was much discrimination, which made it hard for any African American artist to show off their art, through will and persistence several Black musicians, singers, dancers, and actors could perform in clubs and theaters. New expressions of art allowed for the media to see a true representation of Black culture and art, rather than the one that racism influenced. These artists worked hard and were able to represent their own experiences of life as an African American in the US (“Art Movement: Harlem Renaissance” Artland Magazine). Artists introduced many genres of music such as swing, jazz, and blues, and allowed for a lot of creative new ways to use music. With new music on the rise, the interest in theatrical productions and musicals had greatly increased. There was more freedom and accessibility in art, and Black artists began to be able to show their pride in their identities and experiences (“Harlem Renaissance” National Gallery of America). The Harlem Renaissance made a massive change in people’s opinions, and the ways that they shared and experienced …show more content…

There were many tribulations that Black Americans had to overcome in order for them to get their natural rights, and it took a long time before they had the chance to make big marks in the media. When that change finally happened, there were still bigoted people who thought that equal rights were wrong and that discrimination was ok. One successful African American poet, Langston Hughes, didn’t let disapproval stop him. In an excerpt from The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, he said, “If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful…If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves” (Hughes). Langston Hughes showed young Black artists that they could be proud of themselves and for them to not be afraid of showing that pride in their artwork. Hence, he was one of the most pivotal artists from the Harlem Renaissance and influenced countless numbers of people. The Harlem Renaissance was a product of endless hard work from numerous people who wanted to be able to express their art and pride. The mindset of the population changed entirely, as the text states, “The self-portrait of African American life, identity, and culture that

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