Frida Kahlo Women

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Historically, being a woman meant being seen as less than that of a man. For centuries in Western culture being a woman immediately devalued and discredited hard work. Women have been making art since the beginning of time. These important works have not been recorded nor preserved because women have been seen as second-class citizens. Women’s art has been seen as “arts and crafts” instead of the fine art that it was meant to be. Still today women are underrepresented in museums and art galleries. In 1971 an essay was published by art historian Linda Nochlin titled “Why have there been no great women artists?”, this essay sparked the feminist movement of art. No woman artist has ever have had the same level of fame and speculated greatness…show more content…
Frida began painting self-portraits after she was injured badly in a bus crash. Frida Kahlo was a communist artist along with her husband Diego Rivera, whom she married in 1929. She had works exhibited in places like New York and Paris. She was vastly successful and created many great works of art during her career. After her death in 1954, a museum was opened in Mexico in the Blue House, where she grew up. The museum named Museo Frida Kahlo was opened in 1958 and displays many of her important works and artifacts from her…show more content…
She was one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century. Frankenthaler was an abstract artist that focused on color field painting. She invented the soak-stain technique which included her pouring paint onto unfinished canvases. Her works often portrayed landscapes in a peculiar and unique way. Helen Frankenthaler’s professional art career began in 1950 when her painting Beach(1950) was selected to in an exhibition called Fifteen Unknowns: Selected by Artists of the Kootz Gallery. Later in her career, she would have many more exhibitions with massive success sweeping across the nation. By 1959 Helen Frankenthaler was a regular presence in major international museums. Even after her death in 2011, major museums still exhibit Frankenthaler’s work. Helen Frankenthaler was awarded honorary doctorates and received the National Medal of Arts in 2001. She also served as the Vice-Chancellor of the National Council of Arts of the National Endowments for the arts from 1985-2011, when she passed away. She was aa important woman to 20th-century art and a major influence as a hard-working, driven, and creative
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