Disney Princess Chart Analysis

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that calms down the waters, hence, proving to Aquamarine’s father that love truly does exist, but not necessarily romantically. With a brief look at both of these versions of the same story, one might find them extremely different with entirely different core lessons; one being more feminist than the other. Many feminist critics have claimed the progression of fairytales into the modern world and the advancement of gender equality (Gammel, 1994). Yet, according to many other feminist critics, despite the different molds that each story has, the core message is always the same, or at least a similar similar adaptation of it. In this case, and in many, the idea of “love” being the sole capable savior of the story. Due to that repeated moral…show more content…
For example, Cinderella was made a Princess, Tiana (from Princess and the Frog) was also made a Princess. It took Ariel three days to prove to her father that the Prince loved her, while it took two days for Tiana to fall in love with the Prince. Regardless of the fact that Tiana’s dreams were completely different from what the other princesses dreamed of, the idea behind it and the ending of the story is still quite similar. In a way, the ideology of modern fairytales, being to portray the modernization of society and gender equality, has not quite updated from the old ideology of being a passive woman and being saved by a Prince to live happily rich and loved. Similarly, Anderson’s The Little Mermaid ended with the miserable death of the Princess mermaid after her failure to find love and marry the…show more content…
Yet, despite the fact that the more modern versions of the same fairytales tend to work on portraying a more feminist side of the story, the beautiful girl always gets the Prince (or finds any form of love), falls in love, and becomes rich. If not, then misery envelopes the protagonist. Feminist critics try to shed a light on the reality of these stories and how the moral lesson is always the same. Even when it comes to real-life based fairy tales, like Pocahontas, where a young twelve-year-old Native American tribe princess is kidnapped from her family and forced to marry, the only “feminist” version that we hear of today is a Native American young woman who falls in love with a European man who is forcefully taken away from her. Despite the fact that these women had to suffer great ordeals during those times, fairytales have decided to convert this dreadful story into a story of love. In short, fairytales have always been, and always will be, based on the ideology of love being the true key to happiness. Despite the fact that numerous recent adaptations of the same fairytales try to make it more feminist, the “feminist” protagonist is almost always swept off her feet. References Belinkie, M. (2009). The Princess and the Frog: A Comparative Analysis. Overthinkingit.com. Gammel, I. (1994). The Death of the Fairytale Prince: Feminism, Postmodernism and the Sexual Confession. Canadian
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