Disney Stereotypes

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Disney produced many films and cartoons which all of as individuals during our childhood watched and were extremely attached to. These films and cartoons seemed to direct the way we did things, changed our attitudes, and encouraged us to be like the main characters in them. As children or during a human’s childhood, each individual can be extremely influenced and directed by what these films and cartoons portray and the ideas behind them could be highly influential. In addition, Disney played a role in setting the role models of many young children and basing their lifestyles on the lifestyles of the characters portrayed in the films and cartoons. Time came that children grew up and began to realize that Disney portrayed gender in a stereotypical,…show more content…
Reading books shouldn’t describe anything about a gender, males and females should be equally allowed to read without faulty representations of gender. In addition, Belles favorite chapter in the book is her ability to strive to find her prince charming which also presents females as only living to find their price charming, which is a faulty gender perception in the town or in the film. Disney portrays Belle as being like all other Disney princesses on the basis that she is looking for her prince charming which she will eventually get married to and become a happy housewife. All Disney princesses are presented as being incomplete without their prince charming, which portrays females as being dependant on their husbands and independent on their own. In addition, in the film “Beauty and the Beast” there are some racial stereotypes which include skin color and nationality. In the film all characters are white which gives the racial stereotype of excluding black characters, as Disney portrays whites as being of different standards than blacks. Basing stereotypes on skin color portrays discrimination based on race which ruins the image of Disney, but viewers do not pay much attention to this stereotype as it is seen as being normal in our societies and embedded throughout the history of our
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