Diversity In Healthcare

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Studies have been conducted to determine the effects of diversity in healthcare administration. Diverse leadership is associated with improved patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes, reaching strategic goals, and successful decision making. The individuals who responded believed that minority leadership gaps could be closed with positive diversity gaps and giving equal consideration for leadership positions to all applicants. In addition, although diverse candidates for healthcare leadership have grown over the past few years, respondents did not see the same growth in their respective organizations. (Witt/Kieffer, 2011) Diversity leadership is important in healthcare organizations as it will lead to numerous benefits. 62 percent…show more content…
The studies for all surveys conducted in 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2006 showed that although females are more likely to hold positions such as department head, men are more likely to be CEOs. The University of Michigan conducted a study on gender roles in the top 100 hospitals in the United States. Hospitals that were considered high quality and leading healthcare institutions were investigated for this study. The study was conducted to see whether progressive hospitals were likely to have gender diversity in administration and leadership as that is what was assumed. Out of 474 chief administrators, 24 percent were women (114). In addition, the study also showed that 30 percent of the top 100 hundred hospitals did not have any women in chief administration positions. About 34 percent of hospitals had one female chief administrator. (Lantz,…show more content…
The positions that females had were more likely to be chief information officer or human resources officer. The study determined that very little progress was made even in large leading hospitals in the nation, to close gender gaps in healthcare leadership. In fact, the top hospitals in the country should be leaders in closing the gaps and provide a good example of women in high ranking chief positions. (Lantz, 2008) In addition, there is less diversity in pay rates and on surveys that are self-reported, women healthcare executives earn lower salaries as men who are in similar positions. 29 of women said that gender played a vital role in receiving lower compensations in 2006, whereas 1 percent of men said the same. The goal is to expand their representations beyond a chief nursing officer or vice president of human
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