Five Ethical Principles

907 Words4 Pages
Do Two Wrongs Make a Right? We have all heard this saying before. Whether we are trying to excuse ourselves for doing something wrong, or we are giving someone else a hard time about something they did, do two wrongs actually make a right? Or are both completely inexcusable? With help from our five main ethical principles, I will be analysing what they say about two wrongs making a right, and therefore make a conclusion based on those principles. The first of the principles to be analysed, and my personal favourite, is the “Greatest Good” principle. This principle judges actions by analysing possible outcomes and consequences. It states that the bigger number of people to benefit from a particular outcome is the correct decision to make. This…show more content…
This principle states that every person is of intrinsic worth, and that everyone is created equal. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” This principle can actually be related to “Do two wrongs make a right?”. When someone is wronged, and wants to wrong the person who wronged them, and therefore make the second “wrong” to make the situation right, this goes against the “Golden Rule” principle, because one can assume that the person who wronged them is “less than” and needs to perhaps be taught a lesson. In order to want to get this sort of “revenge” against someone else, one can think that their worth is more than the person they are wronging, and therefore it is okay to wrong them. This means that if one did actually follow the “Golden Rule” principle, they should not keep wronging each other, and that two wrongs (or three or four…) definitely do not make a…show more content…
However, from the other three principles, the “Golden rule” principle, the “Relationship” principle, and the “Community” principle, these all directly correlate to how one should act in a wronging situation. They all give proof that it is not necessary to wrong someone who has wronged you in order to make a right. However, just because we have proof that it’s a better answer to let it go than to wrong someone who has wronged you, in no way means that people will stop wronging people who have wronged
Open Document