Henrik Ibsen In A Doll's House

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A DOLL’S HOUSE – HENRIK IBSEN In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, Torvald and his wife, Nora, live a middle class, conservative life with three children. Nora stays at home while Torvald works as a manager at a bank. Nora fits in a role of the little helpless wife whose husband takes care of everything. During the play, she keeps a secret from her husband that eventually leads to the destruction of her marriage. When the secret surfaces, Nora finds out what kind of man she was married to. Maybe she always knew but now she wants to change everything. Nora’s friend Linde was the first one to find out about the secret that Nora had been keeping to herself for many years. A few years earlier her husband was terribly sick and needed to get…show more content…
He was too focused on the fact that her actions would make him lose his manly pride. But later on when Torvald is informed that Krogstad wont tell anyone about this, Torvald calms down and tells Nora that they’r saved. Nora seems upset and he continuously keeps on telling her that he forgives her, as if Nora needed his forgiveness. At this point it becomes clear to Nora that she had been living all these years with a strange man, and had born him three children. Nora realizes that his love for her is not as deep as his self-pride. This realization forces Nora into the real world. It is not only that Torvald would not sacrifice himself for her that opens Nora’s eyes to reality. She did not understand that though Torvald loved her, he loved her as a thing. At the end of the play, Nora deserts her husband so that she may pursue a life with meaning and…show more content…
One is the macaroons. In Act I, the reader learns that Nora's husband has forbidden her from eating macaroons, fearing that they would make her teeth decay. However, she continues to buy them secretly. This shows how Nora is treated like a child by Torvald. Another very important theme in this play is the home. From the very beginning of the play home is a place of comfort, joy, and shelter. Towards the end of the play, the happiness in the Helmer household changes and the imbalance of power becomes a major issue. At this point, the seemingly happy home is revealed as just people putting on an act for each other and the outside
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