Domestic Violence Theory

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CHAPTER – III THEORIES ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Violence against women is wide-spread in society, but it is not universal. There are small scale societies like the Wape of Papua New Guinea and Garos and Khasis of North-Eastern India where domestic violence is at its minimum level or virtually absent. Anthropologists have researched and found out the fact that social relations can be organised to minimise domestic violence. Human beings are social animals and so always stay on relations. Relationship continues on the basis of expected roles & responsibilities at personal or societal level. These expected roles and responsibilities of individual vary from community to community, society to society and situation to situation. It is when intimate…show more content…
The protagonists of this theory believes that unequal accessibility to power to control within the gender sphere in a social set up germinates violent relationship. Patriarchal structure of society defines men to play dominant role in most social institutions. Violence is believed to be a means of maintaining male supremacy in the family when men experience their dominance is being threatened. A consequence of continuity of the patriarchal system men and women both are expected to believe and practice devaluing the feminine and over-vale the masculine. The batters feel less secure in their masculinity than the…show more content…
Individuals are violent because of some internal aberration in brain, abnormality, or defective characteristic. These characteristics include inadequate self-control, sadism, psychopathic personality types, and undifferentiated types of mental illness. Personality disorder due to early childhood experiences of trauma facilitates individual to show violent behaviour. Individuals engaged in domestic violence; do show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anti-social personality disorder, passive-aggression, paranoia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and intermittent explosive disorder. Thus, through medication and psychiatric treatment the mental illness can be treated and the behaviour of the perpetrators of domestic violence can be corrected. (Kemp, Silverman, Steele, Droegemueller & Silver: The battered Child Syndrome, 1962/Snell, Rosenwald and Robey: The Wifebeater’s Wife,
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