Domhoff's Theory Of Power

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Introduction Power has many layers to it, one cannot point out a set definition to it and even a set definition does not establish how to measure it in quantity. It is often invisible within society and can be pervasive. There are three elements to investigate power, namely intentions, counterfactual and capacities. Power has to be actively exercised, in order to be powerful according to Parvin and Chalmers (2012) one should achieve what they want not as a matter of chance, but as a result of some definite action/intention. The second element involves some form of control; it is not just a matter of simply getting what one wants but considering what would happen if the plan of execution does not go according to plan. The third element alerts…show more content…
The discussion will also be looking at the mechanisms of power and processes through which corporate power elites continue to ensure that the government carry out their wishes. Using America as an example to explain Domhoff’s view on the different social and economic class, paper showcases that power is used by corporate elites to maintain and influence government in carrying out their wishes. Though powerful elites occupy high positions, they still need those in the lower strata to oppress and maintain their status and standard of living; seeing systematic oppression and exclusion continuing, stretching the gap between the rich and the…show more content…
Domhoff (2010:176) further states that it consists of specific businesses and corporate sectors gaining favours such as tax breaks and other government assistance needed to realize their short-run and narrow interests for example South African Airways was given 5 billion bailout to cover the 4.7 billon loss they made. The most important aspects of the process include intricate and arcane tax breaks. The special interest groups also work through Congress trying to “hamstring regulatory agencies or reverse military purchasing decisions they do not agree with” (Domhoff, 2010:177). The special-interest process is very important to the corporate community connects them to the government and being able to influence and manipulate policies to working in their favour. Arguably this could be seen as corruption because if an ordinary middle class individual is competing with an individual from the upper class in getting a tender, the corporate elite have more financial influence and state machinery working in their
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