Don Byron's Concert Analysis

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The versatile clarinetist, saxophonist, and composer, Don Byron, opened the fourth day of the festival, which brought a higher magnetism in terms of concerts. In his very own style and using a cathartic, loose language, Byron started with a dedication to Ornette Coleman, playing one of his tunes. Along the way, he still had time for another tribute, a beautiful ballad, this time in honor of the recently deceased Allen Toussaint. For this freewheeling gathering, he brought the Cuban-born pianist Aruan Ortiz, the veteran bassist Cameron Brown, and the unpretentious drummer Bruce Cox. The performance occurred at the New School Auditorium.
Later on, we returned to the Tishman Auditorium for the next three concerts. Owner of a magnificent and original voice, Theo Bleckmann, created his own ethereal, breathable spaces thanks to the fabulous accompaniment by Ben Monder, for me, the most accomplished guitarist of our times. Mr. Monder’s sound waves together with his notable solos combine in
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The prolific 61-year-old sax player, who already recorded more than 40 albums both as leader and co-leader, performs a modern creative jazz that frequently lives of intricate melodic lines, constant interactions, and polyrhythms, which may embrace serene and restful atmospheres, and in the next minute are transformed into an agitated and fulminating chaos. Mr. Berne, who recently saw the third album of his Snakeoil being released by the ECM, introduced his new band, baptized of Sideshow. By presenting three long tunes, he let us anticipate an album release for this fresh project in a near future. The compositions are not far from what was described above, but the illustrious band that followed him here – the crystalline trumpet player Ralph Alessi, the imaginative and intuitive pianist Matt Mitchell, the ingenious bassist John Hébert, and the solid drummer Dan Weiss – assures the intense sound he constantly searches
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