Doodle In The Scarlet Ibis By James Hurst

631 Words3 Pages

What characteristics make someone unique? Do rites of passages change people? Factors in life can alter a human’s speech, actions, and personality. In The Scarlet Ibis written by James Hurst, Doodle is portrayed as naive, persistent, and selfless. Throughout the short story, Doodle’s traits are revealed through his actions and dialogue. In the story, Doodle is depicted as naive. As Doodle was in the barn loft with Brother, he “studied the mahogany box for a long time, then said, ‘It’s not mine’” (466). Though the coffin was his, Doodle could not stand to process the negative aspects of reality. Instead of accepting the fact that the coffin was his, he innocently denied it. As Brother was teaching him to walk, Doodle claimed, “I …show more content…

Doodle was very determined and wanted to please his brother and “Finally one day, after many weeks of practicing, he stood alone for a few seconds”(467). Due to many trials and errors, he eventually learned how to stand alone. Doodle’s persistence had helped him achieve one of his goals. Doodle became tenacious of his newly found ability and “Within a few months Doodle had learned to walk well and his go-cart was put up in the barn loft” (468). This proves that Doodle was incessant and practiced enough to the point where he had learned to walk well. In a matter of months, he no longer needed to be pulled around in his go-cart. Brother began setting goals for him to learn how to swim, run, and climb and it was clear that Doodle “now believed in my infallibility, so we set the deadline for these accomplishments less than a year away” (469). As more progress was made, Doodle became more determined. He and Brother had realized that persistency was the key to achieving Doodle’s …show more content…

Though Doodle continued to practice and get back up, “Doodle told them it was I (Brother) who had taught him to walk” (468). Even if Doodle had done most of the work, he altruistically gave his brother the credit for his accomplishments. By doing so, this gave the trait of selflessness to Doodle. When summer began, Brother “made him swim until he turned blue and row until he couldn't lift an oar” (471). Though Doodle was in pain, he continued to do what he was told in order to please his brother. Doodle became tiresome, but he never let his brother down. As the storm approached Brother

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