Conflict In Rome

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Short Paper Analysis With the onset of an imminent war with the Volscians, Rome found itself in a double danger as threatening differences between its various classes also spurred into internal struggle and conflict. The internal struggles were prompted when the masses of Rome were discontent with the relationship between them and the richer ruling class that they felt were being oppressive and maltreating. This example of double danger within the first century of Roman history gives way to prevailing themes and topics precedented within the Roman civilization however. First and foremost, the internal struggle between the various classes in Rome were inevitable due to its non-egalitarian societal structure, in which classes of people…show more content…
With this dispute and protest even in front of the Senate steps, “[senators] were too much alarmed by the way things were going to even venture into the streets”. Even with the prevailing threat of imminent invasion by the Volscians, the masses were more delighted in humiliating the ruling classes and just letting “the Patricians, they argued, do the fighting” rather than themselves. With many Senators staying away from the streets due to the fear of being in danger by the masses, the decision fell to both Consuls of Rome during the time, Appius Claudius and Publius Servilius. Both consuls however, had different views about the two prevailing issues and what to conclude as a solution. While Claudius held more of an authoritative view upon his subjects, even suggesting to arrest some of the protestors in hopes of dwindling down the discontent masses, Servilius was “inclined to less high-handed measures” and even suggested using persuasion rather than force. Servilius was described to being more “[sympathetic] with the popular cause”. While this difference turned out to not be detrimental to the Roman people as they won the Roman-Volscian wars, tensions between equal partners…show more content…
Looking at examples such as the relationship between Julius Caesar and Pompey or even Octavian and Marc Anthony showed more of the detrimental effects of having tension between equal partners in Roman history. However, even with the differences between Claudius and Servilius, edicts such as making it illegal to imprison Roman Citizens to prevent service or to sell property of soldiers during active service were enacted. This then led to many of the masses into taking the military oath. With ongoing internal and external pressures, this is what Rome did in order to respond to this situation of civil unrest for inclusion that did affect its military actions. However, with the hierarchical shape of Roman Society, the two consuls were able to make amends with the discontent protesters. Last but not least is the prevailing theme of Rome’s absorption of different communities and individuals. Even with the advantage of internal strife and struggle within Rome, the Volscians failed in their attack against the Romans and were routed. Rome still had an army ready due to the compromise between the masses and rulers just before. On the
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