Double Suicide In Romeo And Juliet Analysis

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Suicide is the act of intentionally causing one's own death, usually due to mental or emotional conflict. Although both of the two star-crossed lovers, Romeo and Juliet, commit this act due to their forbidden love, it is not the only contribution to their deaths. It is reasonable to blame their tragedy of double-suicide on fate. But, more realistically, mistakes are made because they are young, naive, and not being counselled properly. Romeo and Juliet, a theatrical romantic tragedy assumed to be written by William Shakespeare in 1596, is a play in which adults and friends fail in their duties to influence the two lovers to make proper decisions, which lead to the heartbreaking deaths of Romeo and Juliet. This is clearly demonstrated through…show more content…
As Juliet's father, he possesses a large amount of power and responsibility. “Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise; An you be mine, i’ll give you to my friend; An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, for, by my soul, I’ll ne'er acknowledge thee, nor what is mine shall never do thee good. Trust to't, bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn” (Shakespeare 3.5.191-194). He is exerting his paternal control by demanding Juliet marry Paris, threatening to never acknowledge again if she does not obey him. By reason of his ability to turn any situation around, he is partially to blame for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. “Alone, in company, still my care hath been; To have her matched. And having now provided; a gentleman of noble parentage” (Shakespeare 3.5.178-180). Lord Capulet fails in the sense that he rushes Juliet into a marriage solely because he is of noble upbringing- “Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly trained” (Shakespeare 3.5.181). He does not take into account what hardships Juliet and Romeo might experience at such a young age. Capulet is repeatedly using his power and authority over Juliet in the benefit of only himself. At this time, it was normal in society for young girls to be married for the wealth and well being of the family, but he is very insensitive about her emotions. He insists that Juliet marry Paris, with the alternative being that he will disown her. In addition,…show more content…
She is generally portrayed as Juliet's older confidant. She is frequently shown to have an ignorant and questionable way of handling situations which, unfortunately, results in her contribution to the tragedies in this play. “Then hie you hence to Friar Lawrence’s cell. There stays a husband to make you a wife.” (Shakespeare 2.5.61-62). When Juliet goes to the Nurse for advice, regarding Romeo, the Nurse encourages Juliet to marry Romeo, when she should’ve explained the risk in going through with the wedding and the consequences that would follow. “Hie you to church. I must another way; To fetch a ladder, by the which your love; Must climb a bird’s nest soon when it is dark” (Shakespeare 2.5.65-67). As Romeo is banished from Verona, he helps arrange for Romeo and Juliet to see each other in secret. The Nurse has plentiful opportunities to use her power over Juliet to slow things down but instead, she does not discourage anything and urges her to continue down dark paths. She helps arrange the marriage and betrays her primary role as a caregiver for Juliet. In the end, the Nurse leads Juliet astray and has her own schedule for Juliet and Romeo's marriage. She also advises Juliet to consider marrying Paris, saying, “Then, since the case…he’s a lovely gentleman,” (Shakespeare 3.5.217-219) which is what drove Juliet to seek the Friars consultation, resulting in the nonsensical plan
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