Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: An Analysis

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“Everybody can be great ... because anybody can serve. You don 't have to have a college degree to serve. You don 't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” A quote such as that came from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and it is obvious he truly believed that to be evident. During the less than 13 years of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s leadership of the modern American Civil Rights Movement, from December, 1955 until April 4, 1968, African Americans achieved more genuine progress toward racial equality in America than the previous 350 years had produced. (The King Center, 2014) Dr. King was a minister, civil rights leader and advocate for peace and change all over…show more content…
The Supreme Court ruled segregated seating on public buses unconstitutional in November 1956. By that time, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr organized a nonviolent resistance. Dr. King was heavily influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and African American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, nonviolence, and gay rights, Bayard Rustin. Because of his great influence with his protests, he became the target of white supremacist who longed for his demise and a stop to Blacks standing up and making a difference. Martin’s house was firebombed in January 1957 by those hate-fueled groups. But despite the adversity he encountered, he never gave up his dream of a better nation filled with brotherhood, love and…show more content…
King’s most famous act occurred. This was the day of the March on Washington for jobs and freedom. The march, which became a key moment in the growing struggle for civil rights in the United States, culminated in Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, an inspiring call for racial justice and equality. This iconic rally was the largest ever seen in the US, it drew between 200,000 and 300,000 police and participants, to whom King delivered his famous (The Christian Science Monitor, 2012). In 1965, 2 years after the March on Washington, Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders organized a series ofmarches in Selma, Alabama to the Montgomery, Alabama to fight for voting rights for
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