To How The Grinch Stole Christmas Character Analysis

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The whimsical world of Dr Seuss has mesmerised children for decades. From The Cat in the Hat to How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Dr Seuss has introduced a world of rhyme and image, with the power to alleviate our boredom, challenge our imaginations, and even shape our young lives. In some ways, Dr Seuss seems as unexpected and paradoxical a character as one of his own creations. His last name wasn 't Seuss, he wasn 't a doctor, and he never had his own children – nor was he particularly comfortable around them. Dr Seuss is the penname of Theodor Seuss Geisel. He began using it as a pseudonym when he was caught with gin in his dormitory and was asked to step down as editor of Dartmouth’s humour magazine. To evade his punishment he started…show more content…
He turns his business into a profitable factory. However, the Lorax emerges from the stump of the trees and disapproves the felling of the trees, complaining that the factory has polluted the air and the water. Once the last tree is chopped down, the factory closes and the Lorax leaves. Where he last stood is a small stump engraved with a single word: "UNLESS". The Once-ler ponders this message for a long time until a boy comes to him and he realises “UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It 's not.” He then gives the boy the last Truffula seed and urges him to grow a forest from…show more content…
The Oncle-ler is an entrepreneur and is representative of capitalism and how it is destroying the world. The Lorax is persevering, relentless and commanding in his effort to protect the environment. He is the voice of the trees and aptly represents environmental movements. The book satirises the fact that when humans extract materials from the environment, we greedily exploit these resources and try to obtain them faster and more efficiently. Now that the problem of global warming is finally acknowledged, humans try to fix the problem and redeem themselves. The Lorax strongly connects to the problem of global warming today. Perhaps the reason that Dr. Seuss 's books resonate with children (and ultimately, with adults) is because he took his audience of young readers very seriously. "Writing children 's books is a sweat-and-blood thing," he once told a reporter. I have come to love the bizarre world of Dr Seuss. Not only was he a brilliant writer and illustrator, he was able to embed morals and lessons into his writing in an enjoyable manner. My favourite of all his quotes has to be, “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you will
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