Transcendentalism In Brave New World

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Societal dysfunction, such as economic depression, provokes compelling fantasies, leaving individuals curious about “what ifs” and the possibility of astonishing alternate realities. Furthermore, fluctuations in social dynamics, like a sharp increase in the rise of unemployment and the establishment of friction amongst divided classes, create the ideal environment for new ideas and daring literature. Consequently, Aldous Huxley embodied the aforementioned passion for dysfunction during a time when society was exceedingly turbulent; these conditions lead to his creation of the novel Brave New World in 1931. Huxley 's work was a premonition for the future in relation to a powerful central government and complacent individuals.
This anti-transcendentalist
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Roughly a decade after the publication of Huxley’s work, a perfect modern day example emerged rapidly with the rise of Germany during World War 1. Hitler brazenly instituted harsh laws that dominated and destroyed the lives the Jewish community. However, other individuals praised him endlessly while blissful ignorance birthed happiness. While Huxley could not have fathomed Germany’s growth and Hitler’s reign, these situations correlate well with the atmosphere of World State and the position of Mustapha Mond, a leader that is wholly aware of the sacrifices made for the betterment of…show more content…
According to History.com, from 1953-73, the government tested the mind control effects Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on both consenting and unconsenting participants. The hallucogines were intended to make the test subjects more docile and easier to command; this was also the premeditated function of Soma in the novel. Soma sent users into a euphoric state, making them content with the oppressive circumstances of World State. Thoughts of revolts and societal change eluded substance soaked minds, giving the government a strong sense of security and control.
Even though Huxley could not predict the future, themes of Brave New World became clearly prevalent in our society after his popular work came to light. His foreboding intuition about the presence of powerful central governments, conditioning of human beings, and attempts of mind control were all too real. Consequently, Huxley’s work foreshadowed the societal issues experienced in the mid-twentieth century and could have been used to identify the ominous circumstances, in order to prevent their occurrence. Brave New World perfect example of issues that arise with the advancement of
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