Dystopian Society In George Orwell's 1984

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In many novels such as 1984 by George Orwell, they use the ideas of an almost perfect or a non-perfect world or society. Orwell portrays two types of utopias in his novel, 1984 but they can be seen as both, depending on what aspect the reader is looking at. A utopian society is an imagined place or state in which everything appears perfect to a certain point. A dystopian society is a conceived place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading society. Orwell uses Winston Smith to project the utopian society, he has made by showing how it affects the people. Both forms of life in the novel are shown progressively throughout the novel. In the novel 1984, George Orwell uses a dystopian…show more content…
Winston’s character is affected throughout the creation and expansion of the plot from both the utopian and dystopian society. In 1984, Oceania is supposed to be a perfect utopian in the mindset of the Party. But Winston disagrees, this is the main contributor to the use of a dystopian society in the novel. In the beginning of the novel, Winston starts to write in his diary which he bought from Mr.Charrington’s antique shop, “His pen had slid voluptuously over the smooth paper, printing in large neat capitals DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER…” (Orwell 18). This is a start to Winston’s hatred towards the Party and Big Brother, showing a lot about his character towards the beginning of the novel. Winston soon believes that the Party is, in actuality, dreadful and he wants it gone. The characteristics of Winston, shows that he is strong and a good example of a person…show more content…
The ideal perfect world for the Party is having complete control over their people and having no independent thoughts. We are informed while reading that there is someone always watching and listening no matter where or what a person is doing. The citizens barely have any space in their minds that is fully theirs, they are not even safe in their own thoughts (Orwell 27). In the novel the Party is the main reason why no one has any individual thoughts, just because they want a perfect society, “Moreover, the book’s emotional pace is frequently interrupted by the insertion of long sections of straight political theorizing”(Roelofs). We are shown through Winston’s perspective how this is portrayed. At some points Winston is with Julia and we are shown how their relationship is growing, but then at another point it is interrupted. Such as when they were both captured by Mr. Charrington, we are put at a standstill with the progression of all emotions in the novel. Orwell is constantly stopping and continuing the pace of emotions in the novel but staying on point when it comes to the Party’s control. They have worked so hard to create this perfect utopian society and will do anything to keep anyone from attempting to chance it. The government has created jobs such as Winston’s, the Records Department of the Ministry of Truth to alter the past to their liking. This is mainly done so no one has
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