1984 A Dystopian Analysis

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In many novels such as 1984 by George Orwell, they use the ideas of an almost perfect or a non-perfect world or society. Orwell portrays two types of utopias in his novel, 1984 but they can be seen as both, depending on what aspect the reader is looking at. A utopian society is an imagined place or state in which everything appears perfect to a certain point. A dystopian society is a conceived place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading society. Orwell uses Winston Smith to project the utopian society, he has made by showing how it affects the people. Both forms of life in the novel are shown progressively throughout the novel. In the novel 1984, George Orwell uses a dystopian…show more content…
In 1984, Oceania is supposed to be a perfect utopian in the mindset of the Party. But Winston disagrees, this is the main contributor to the use of a dystopian society in the novel. In the beginning of the novel, Winston starts to write in his diary which he bought from Mr.Charrington’s antique shop, “His pen had slid voluptuously over the smooth paper, printing in large neat capitals DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER…” (Orwell 18). This is a start to Winston’s hatred towards the Party and Big Brother, showing a lot about his character towards the beginning of the novel. Winston soon believes that the Party is, in actuality, dreadful and he wants it gone. The characteristics of Winston, shows that he is strong and a good example of a person who is independent in his society. With the progression of the novel in the late “books” the feelings Winston had soon begun to change. With the torture that O’Brien put him through inside the Room 101, he starts to become accepting of the utopian lifestyle the Party and Big Brother are going for. At the end, Winston accepts and appreciates Big Brother and all of their doings and ideas. He soon accepts and admits to not thinking the same way as everyone else when it was all finally over (Orwell 298). Throughout the whole novel, we see the character development of Winston, his hatred towards Big Brother and the Party is gone.…show more content…
The main idea of the plot is that the perfect society is not so perfect after all. The Party tries to make Oceania the best and perfect place to live, they are trying to create a perfect society but end up creating a dystopia instead. In this society, citizens are not allowed to love one another, but instead throw away their sexual urges. People are not allowed to show or have these urges because the government is scared of them. They think that these urges will lead to a person discovering their own self or individuality, and the Party strongly prohibited this (Stanley 239). Each and every citizen in Oceania is stripped from their enjoyment and thoughts as a whole. These people have no feeling in anything unless it has any involvement with Big Brother. Even though these people are told what to do, what to think, and what to believe in, not everyone is on board. In Orwell’s novel all of the overall happiness is removed and all that’s left is a quiet dreadful society (Wanner 3). In their “perfect world” if there is any thought or an occurrence of a rebellion, in a single person’s mind then there world could come crashing down. But if there is a chance of a rebellion, the Party and Big Brother could be destroyed. There are powers in numbers, something the Party likes to encourage but undoubtedly
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