Early Childhood Poverty

639 Words3 Pages
During this course, I have learned a great deal of information concerning issues and trends that has been essential to my early childhood profession, however, poverty have stirred my passion in so many ways. In our society, poverty is a devastating issue in the early childhood field that can affect children and families of all cultural diversity. According to Atinc & Wright, “200 million children under the age of five in the developing world are at risk of not reaching their full development potential because they suffer from negative consequences of poverty nutritional deficiencies” (Atinc & Wright (2013). During my research, I have learned that other country such as Africa and Asia experience worst poverty that prevent the children…show more content…
As an early childhood educator, I must say, that poverty is a serious problem and every childhood educator needs to be aware of this, in order to demonstrate compassion toward children and their families. For instance, it is important that EC understand the socioeconomic status of the children and families that they serve. Consequently, research and knowledge about poverty would allow EC to understand the children better, such as their individual needs. However, knowing how to assist children and their families, based on the resources makes a difference. As an early childhood educator, children of poverty can benefit from learning through accommodations. For an example, if they are homeless, they can finish their assignments while in school or maybe food bags can be provided at school to take home…show more content…
(Executive Producer). (2011). Issues and trends in the early childhood field: The effects of poverty on the early childhood community. Baltimore, MD: Author. Gorski, P. (2008). The myth of the "culture of poverty". Educational Leadership, 65(7), 32–36. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases. Atinc, T. M., & Gustafsson-Wright, E. (2016, July 28). Early Childhood Development: the Promise, the Problem, and the Path Forward | Brookings Institution. Retrieved June 28, 2017, from
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