Early Childhood: The Biological Trait Theories

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The emphasis upon infancy and early childhood may align serial killers with the Biological Trait Theories. These theories focus upon biological conditions that may control human behaviors. Neurophysiology is the study of brain function. It has uncovered neurological and physical abnormalities that may begin as early as the prenatal stage in some humans. There have been links between the impairment of executive brain function and aggression through such research (Aynesworth 1999). Many of the serial killers discussed have been labeled with some sort of neurological disorder. Thus, these repetitive serial killers may just be reacting to chemicals and hereditary factors in their brains rather than on pure evil. Another Criminological…show more content…
The decay of these offenders’ personalities begins at infancy for many and continues through childhood and into adulthood. The serial killer tends to be neglected during significant stages of infancy, where in which the development of the human personality begins. As these offenders enter childhood they are still at a disadvantage socially, often as a result of abuse and parental issues. Serial killers often lack self control, as well as other critical characteristics of a law abiding citizen. It seems as if socialization plays a large roll in the formation of these monsters. A number of other criminological theories can be applied to the serial killer in some form, however there are still anomalies. The Biological Trait Theories, Psychodynamic theory, and the Organized/Disorganized theory all attempt to explain the inexplicable actions of serial killers. The biological trait theories apply as there is great emphasis on infancy and childhood emotional growth. The psychodynamic theory applies as well as these men display actions that seem to be driven by their id personality. Lastly, the organized/disorganized theory attempts to conclude personality and behavioral characteristics from crime scene…show more content…
Childhood abuse has been given varying levels of blame in the development of serial killers. De Becker (1997) quoted Ressler’s research and stated that “100 percent [of serial killers] had been abused as children, either with violence, neglect, or humiliation” (p. 55). Ressler and Shachtman (1992) report that, “over 40 percent of the [serial] murderers reported being physically beaten and abused in their childhoods. More than 70 percent said they had witnessed or been part of sexually stressful events when young…” (p. 85). Although other motivations for killing exist, this study will focus on Lust Killers, those who kill for some sexual gratification (Egger, 2002; Hickey, 2002). Lust killers may engage in sex with someone and kill them to prevent leaving a
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