Early Colonial Women

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Section A: Identification and Evaluation of Sources This investigation will focus on the question, how did the role and view of white women evolve from the beginning to the end of the American Colonial Era? Events occurring between 1607 and 1775, focusing on events in the beginning and end of the era, will be examined in order to answer this question fully. This time period will be analyzed according to the views and roles of the early colonial period compared to the late colonial period. The evolution of these roles and views will then be carefully analyzed to demonstrate how and why this change occurred. The first examined source will be The Birth of the Nation by Arthur M. Schlesinger. This book, published in 1968, examines…show more content…
Dominated by a completely male society, the rules of this time were made by those in power- rich, white men. Women had little place in society, but when first arriving in the colonies, they were viewed as helpful and necessary. When comparing the start of the colonial era to the end, it can be seen that the views and roles of women in this time period were downgraded tremendously. By the time the American Revolution came in 1775, the 1607 mentality of women as necessary was gone and replaced by the view of women as property and worthless. This change came about during this time period due to the events and ever-growing technology of the era, increasing the burden put upon…show more content…
This changed view of women came about due to progressive technology, little knowledge on women, and keeping them from freedom. Due to technology, women weren’t as needed to work with their husbands out in the fields, so their roles evolved to domestic chores. These domestic chores in turn kept the men from knowing about women's jobs, such as caring for the children, creating an atmosphere of mystery around them. The fact that women were always so close to childbirth and medicine for the family also helped to create the perception of magic, leading to the Salem Witch Trials. Keeping women locked up and away from society also contributed to the increasing negative views of women as they began to act out without freedoms. The roles and views of women were downgraded during the colonial era, contributing to the struggle of women to be endured for many years to
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