The Effects Of Poverty

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Many socioeconomic conditions increase the vulnerability of people to risks such as poor health. The conditions include the inadequacy of housing, lack of access to education, violence in the community, and exposure to deteriorated conditions (Ladd, 2012). However, according to Caminada and Martin (2012), none of these factors increases the vulnerability of the community and its people, as much as poverty. The impact of poverty includes that it affects every other aspect of community and social life, and its effects include poor health, disability, and increases in mortality levels (Burgard, 2012). The effects of poverty have been reported since the beginning of the 20th century, and they continue to be reported. In particular, the impacts…show more content…
Notably, national unemployment levels rose to 25 percent; unemployment levels for groups such as African Americans were about double the national level. The reduction in tax revenues and the increased pressure for the assistance offered to the citizens led local and state governments to bankruptcy. The human services programs adopted during the years that followed, for example, 1936, included the new federal relief program that distributed about $ 1 billion as a direct relief to the citizens. The large proportion of aid was offered as cash paid for labor, based on programs such as the civil works administration and the work projects administration, among other programs. The programs entailing the delivery of cash or payment in kind to families was aimed at increasing access healthcare, and educational services, which was designed to prevent child labor. The most impactful programs of the time included the social security Act that was passed in 1935, noting that it reduced the levels of poverty and experience of vulnerability, in particular among the aged. As of 1937, it was clear that the New Deal approach towards ending the depression had failed, although it stopped the deterioration of the economy; improved living standards, and made poverty eradication an important aspect of public policy (Sareen, et al.,…show more content…
In the years that followed, the US economy expanded considerably, particularly in the areas of employment. The economic growth of the 1940s was fueled by the increase in consumer demand due to the post-war baby boom. In particular, programs such as the introduction of affordable mortgage plans for the members of the military led to a housing boom. In particular, the US government’s willingness to spend more and more money towards the growth of industries such as the auto industry, digital electronics, and others led to the widespread expansion of the economy. The economic boom continued into the 1950s and 60s, and the effects included an increase in employment levels, the growth of a middle-class population and a reduction in poverty levels. Approximately, household poverty reduced from the 44 percent reported in 1939 to the low level of 22 percent as of 1960. The human services advances made during the same period include that the healthcare standards of the citizens were improved considerably (Burgard, 2012). The human service programs that marked the improvements included that universal vaccinations for children were offered, and the government adopted more efficient technologies for testing and monitoring
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