Economic Outcomes In The Great Migration Analysis

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"We cannot escape our origins, however hard we might try, those origins contain the key – could we but find it – to all that we later become." (Wilkerson, 302pg.) Being an African American in 1840 living the United States, meant shackles was on hands and feet. Just hoping the family can all stay together, standing on stages being looked at looked at and evaluated like livestock. North Carolina is where this journey began with people stripping other people of their culture, language, religion, and identity-- to only give them another one. The bidding has started, people are yelling out numbers trying to get the strongest of the strong. Sold to the highest bidder, put in the back of a truck not ready for the long journey from North Carolina to…show more content…
" Some how my father from out that Mr.O 'Shannon was his father, I never found out how my father knew or found out. They left the next day , on the bus on our way to St. Louis . I was not born yet but in my mother 's belly" Jane remember stories she heard "The great migration was one of the most significant demographer event in US history." (Eichenlaub,2). "Moving Out but Not Up: Economic Outcomes in the Great Migration" talks about economic issues of the great migration. It also talks about the job that was available, and compared the cost to picking cotton (Eichenlaub,1pg). "Moving northward and to the Mid-west, the number of Negroes leaving the various southern states more or less coincided with the degree of harshness under which they attempted to live and…show more content…
Louis Missouri, and finally to Chicago Illinois. Peal and John Shannon lived on Mr. John O’Shannon tobacco farm with their six children. After John finds out that Mr.O 'Shannon is his father, he takes his family to live in St. Louis. After leaving St. Louis the Shannons move to Chicago. The Shannon-Mingo family left the Jim-crew south that kept them oppressed, but they found love and
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