Economic Superiority Of The Medieval World: The Case Of Venice And Europe

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Effect of Islamic economic superiority of medieval world on the Christian Europe: The case of Venice and Egypt Name: Institution: Effect of Islamic economic superiority of medieval world on the Christian Europe: The case of Venice and Egypt Introduction Though the Christians and the Muslims were highly opposed to each other in religious principles, the long distance trade established by the Muslims with the Christians resulted in increased economic activity in Europe. Particularly, in the Middle Ages, the Italian ports were not commercial and were largely dormant owing to the fallout of the Roman Empire. Commercial activity in the whole Europe was minimal and it remained an agricultural economy. Since there was a lack of means and technologies for carrying out long-distance trade, maritime trade was restricted to a regional level. The business potential of the Islamic world brought a sea change in the economic scenario of Europe. The establishment of long-distance trade with the Muslim world was a great opportunity for the Italian cities to acquire exotic materials and increase profit. The adventure seeking nature and entrepreneurial ability of the Muslims of the Medieval era led to enhanced commercial activities in the region. The trade in the Christian areas began to thrive owing to their active engagement with the Muslim trading world. Researchers argue that it was the Muslim world’s influence that led to the advancement of many cities in Christian

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