Edgar Allan Poe Point Of View Analysis

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Death, although not the nicest of topics, is one that catches the eye of many readers. In some of the most famous stories from around the world, death is a plot twist, an ending, and even a beginning. Death can make readers cry or smile, make readers happy or sad, even when it is just a story. The stories of Edgar Allan Poe show readers the darkest parts of human nature and death. Poe’s use of a first person point of view, obsessive characters and the guilt of murder creates a unique writing style. Poe uses a first person point of view in his stories to create a personal, direct relationship with the reader. Poe also allows for the reader to truly see into the characters, and put themselves in place of the characters. At the beginning of Poe’s…show more content…
In “The Cask of Amontillado”, Poe uses a character’s obsession to show what a man will do in order to get revenge. The man stops at nothing to find a way to exploit Fortunato, and would stop at nothing to get his revenge. The narrator says, “At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitively settled…” (“The Cask of Amontillado” 3). The narrator then continues to explain how he will proceed in getting his revenge, “He had a weak point—this Fortunato—although in other regards he was a man to be respected and even feared. He prided himself on his connoisseurship in wine” (“The Cask of Amontillado” 3). The man, obsessed with getting his revenge on Fortunato, will stop at nothing to do so. He discovers Fortunato’s strengths, and uses them to exploit him, all in order to get revenge for what Fortunato had done. Poe uses obsession to show how insane his characters are, as well as show the types of things they will do, and both uses of obsessions help create Poe’s unique style of…show more content…
The narrator says, “There came forth in reply only a jingling of the bells. My heart grew sick… I hastened to make an end of my labor” (“The Cask of Amontillado” 10). The narrator wanted nothing but revenge on Fortunato, but it seems as once he gets it, he has a sense of regret, or guilt. When the narrator says “My heart grew sick”, it can lead the reader to seeing the humane side of someone who is murdering another man. In the end, Fortunato is killed and no one knows about it but the narrator, and he seems to brag about that fact, but for a brief second there was a feeling of guilt that can let the reader infer many things about the character. Guilt helps Poe to not only develop his character’s insane sides, but the sides that make the reader question whether or not that murder was actually a bad
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