Effective Smoking Policy

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Effective Smoking Policy for a Better College Environment Smoking is a modern plague on society that has been causing health and environmental issues for the past few centuries. As public opinion on the dangers of smoking has vastly evolved over the past century, many college campuses across the United States have shifted to a learning environment free of tobacco use. While banning all forms of tobacco use seems like an easy solution to the problem, secondhand smoking and cigarette littering are still a major issue that even extends outside of universities. Reducing the amount of smoking is an important factor in the overall health and cleanliness of a campus. With many campuses having ineffective policies on smoking, having a program that…show more content…
With studies backed by collected data of smoking violations, Christopher M. Seitz writes that “students, faculty, and staff might not comply with smoking policies that prevent smoking” (Seitz et al. 333). With no enforcement on the policies set forth, there is no reason for anyone to comply with them. Similarly, jaywalking is an illegal act that has dangerous consequences, but most people will cross a street even when they are not supposed to. Both can be deadly, but avoidable. In the study done by Seitz et al., a group of researchers cleared selected areas of cigarette litter and counted how many new cigarettes ends there were after a month. What they discovered was shocking as there were over 7,862 counts of smoking violations over seven buildings, which further shows that even with prohibited smoking zones, policy violations are rampant. Over time, the amount of cigarette litter quickly builds up, creating a littered campus. Seitz et al., conclude that policies are not effective at preventing smoking which makes it seem as if there is no point in even regulating no-smoke zones. However, the study also mentions a possibility that a stricter smoking policy could have different results. In a similar study done by Harris et al., the research goes beyond simply counting cigarette litter by introducing varying levels of smoking control to…show more content…
One opinion is that the implementation of smoking policies on college campuses is lacking. Dr. Kirsten Rodgers analyzed public college smoking ban studies and wrote that “no studies were found in which colleges implemented multi component smokeless tobacco prevention and control efforts” (Rodgers, 258). Her findings show that there are good intentions to smoking bans, but there is a lack of initiative to take policies further. Another opinion is if colleges should even control student smoking. Michael E. Hall, Health Scientist at Florida Atlantic University, did a large study on student and faculty opinions on smoking issues. Dr. Hall points out that there are “major differences in attitudes toward tobacco-free campus policy and secondhand smoke beliefs among the sample population” which he believes is why smoking policies need to be tailored to the needs of a school (Hall et al. 55). In the study, students and smokers were both more likely to support hands off approaches to smoking policy than college staff members. Allowing students to smoke may seem like a necessary freedom, but its associated issues make it something that should be controlled. Secondhand smoking is one of the biggest reasons for smoking control. While a smoker may have the freedom to smoke, it does not give them the freedom to affect the health of other people through secondhand smoke. According to the CDC, “there is no risk-free level of
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