Supervision In Counselling

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Supervision Learning about yourself is essential to be an effective counsellor, understanding your personal triggers and taking responsibility of learning from key events in life is essential to have longevity and success as a counsellor, (Johns, 1996, Corey, 2013). Working as a therapist can be an isolating, difficult occupation (McLeod, 2013), however supervision, provides support, professional development and facilitates reflection (Bond, 2010). Consequently, it provides a process of monitoring and evaluating the counsellor’s standard of work (Clark and West, 2004). Effective supervision requires the supervisee to bring high quality information about the therapeutic process, (McLeod, 2013), a means of providing this information is using…show more content…
20). Kagan and his associates observed the information gained from evaluation of a video recording and by use of prompts from a second person (Kagan, 1975). Student counsellors then observed brief recordings of therapy to enable their identification of “The thoughts and feelings of the client”, (Kagan, 1975 p. 75). A further aspect of the research involved those in the therapy recording sessions. Kagan, Krathwohl and Farquhar, utilised the video recorder within the counselling room for teaching, consequently reviewing the recording with both client and therapist, (Kagan, 1975). The purpose of recording sessions was to “Develop a test of situation empathy or affective sensitivity”, (Campbell, Kagan and Krathwohl, 1971 cited by Kagan, 1975). A member of the research team joined each individual participant, and replayed the recording, everyone involved could stop the recording, (Kagan, 1975). The role of the second party was to “Encourage, facilitate and probe”, (Kagan, 1975, p.75). IPR facilitates a “Learning-by-discovery (which is) assertive and confrontive”, (Kagan, 1980 cited by Cashwell, 1994 p. 1). The second party also uses Rogers core…show more content…
The use of IPR helps to understand these covert feelings by recording a session with a client, (Foster and Lloyd-Hazlett, 2014, p.2). A further aspect of the research involved those in the therapy recording sessions. A member of the research team joined each individual participant, and replayed the recording, everyone involved could stop the recording, (Kagan, 1975). The role of the second party was to “Encourage, facilitate and probe”, (Kagan, 1975, p. 75). IPR facilitates a “Learning-by-discovery philosophy (which is) assertive and confrontive”, (Kagan, 1980 cited by Cashwell, 1994, p.1). The second party also uses Rogers core conditions (Rogers, 1961). The use of IPR helps to understand these covert feelings by recording a session with a client, (Foster and Lloyd-Hazlett, 2014,
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