Effects Of Isolation In Frankenstein

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Does Isolation Really Affect You? Joseph Roux, a French priest, poet, and philologist states, “Solitude vivifies; isolation kills”. Solitude is the state of being alone, while isolation is to remain alone or be apart from others, whether it’s emotionally or physically. Physical isolation is when people distance themselves from any physical contact from humans, while emotional isolation is when they shun something emotionally. In Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, isolation is approached differently from each character and the theme that isolation is dangerous, is carried throughout. Victor, the Creation and Robert Walton have all suffered from isolation, both physically and emotionally. Robert Walton is able to escape the dangers of isolation,…show more content…
In the university whither I was going I must form my own friends and be my own protector” (Shelley 30). Although, Victor received great love and care from his parents, he found himself lost and feeling like he had no one to talk to, which led his drive for knowledge, only make his isolation worse and not caring about those around him. Victor’s isolation started while he was away at college, when he started to make his Creation. While working nonstop on the Creation, Victor isolated himself by not staying in contact with those he cares about. Victor states to Walton, “And the same feelings which made me neglect the scenes around me caused me also to forget those friends who were so many miles absent, and whom I had not seen for so long a time” (Shelley 41). Victor neglected his family while in the two year process of creating human life. While spending countless hours on his creation, Victor became ill, malnourished and sleep deprived because of the his state of mind that isolation had caused him. The amount of isolation Victor put…show more content…
He was rejected by his creator and then by society due to his appearance. His disfiguring image made it impossible for the creature to have any hope in socializing with any human with eyes. It was nature which revealed his appearance to him, when he looked in the pool and saw his reflection. The creation says to Victor,, ‘“I had admired the perfect forms of my cottagers- their grace, beauty, and delicate complexions; but how was I terrified when I viewed myself in a transparent pool! At first I started back, unable to believe that it was indeed I who was reflected in the mirror; and when I became fully convinced that I was in reality the monster that I am” (Shelley 101-102). After observing the cottagers and their grace, beauty, and delicate complexions, the creation feels unloved and unwanted. He realizes that in fact he is a monster, and he is filled with bitterness because he can’t live a happy life like the DeLacey’s. The creation learns to understand that he isn’t a normal human being, and instead of being loved and respected, he is treated like a monster. On the mountains of Chamonix he is talking to Victor and the Creation describes his appearance and the isolation it is causing him, stating to himself, ‘“God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance. Satan had his
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