Effects Of Multilingualism In The Philippines

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Multilingualism in Students of Tarlac State University – Laboratory High School Karl Benedict G. Banag University of the Philippines Abstract T Multilingualism in Students of Tarlac State University – Laboratory High School Background In the islands of the Philippines, there are over a hundred native languages. Except for Chavacano, all of them belong to the Malayo-polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian family of languages. Chinese-Mandarin and Fookein, as well as Spanish are also used by some sectors of Philippine society. Filipino is one of the country’s official languages; English is the other official language. The archipelagic state of the Philippines caused Filipinos to have different languages spoken. In every area, region or island there is a particular language spoken by most residents. Having the most number of native speakers, there are eight major ethno-linguistic groups in the Philippines. These are Ilokano, Pangasinense, Kapampangan, Tagalog, Bikol, Hiligaynon, Samarnon-Leytenon and Cebuano. Ilokano, Kapampangan and Tagalog are the widely used language in the northern Philippines while Cebuano in the southern part. These languages are the lingua franca—the language that is used among people who speak various different languages. All over the archipelago, Filipino is considered the national lingua franca. This means despite the having different language spoken a group of people from different ethno-linguistic groups can communication with each other with

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