Effects Of Stress On Child Development

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Stress and Child Development Stress is referred to as any uncomfortable emotional experience which is followed by predictable biochemical, physiological and behavioral changes (Baum, 1990). Factors that cause stress, otherwise known as stressors, stem from problems found in life, work, etc. Stress is a response that is caused by a demand. There are those who believe that stress is introduced in adulthood, especially the younger generation that makes the decision to venture off on their own by leaving the comfort of home and the care of parents. Others understand that stress is birthed much at the much younger age of adolescence. The daily struggles of a full day education and the desire to work are stressor. Famously enough, peer pressure…show more content…
Stress can have the power to deteriorate the human body mentally, emotionally and physically. It is known that stress can affect an unborn child significantly. At such a delicate time in child development, the stressors received by the mother can cause permanent damage to the unborn child. Maternal and prenatal stress and can affect brain development caused by adverse pregnancy outcomes, which include fetal growth retardation and autism (Relier, 2001). When an infant is frequently terrified, which triggers the brain to produce too many stress hormones early in life, it can cause the brain to become incapable of responding normally to stress. Later in life, the infant may become hypervigilant (always on the alert) or (emotionally flat) never happy, sad or angry (Berger, 2011). When stress is being prolonged in young children, it can stop or slow down brain development. Many young children have their frontal lobes not fully developed, this makes it difficult for their brain to respond rationally to stress. The comfort and reassurance of safety by the caregivers can help young children handle stress and stay…show more content…
Extreme stress leads to the release of stress hormones that are known to cause a decline of the growth hormone resulting in psychosocial dwarfism (Berk, 2010). The decline of the growth hormone can cause a short stature disorder and in turn affect or delay the developmental stage of childhood to adulthood, including puberty. Stress in children may bring about health problems related to the asthma, common cold, cancer, diabetes, infectious diseases, epileptic seizures, and leukemia (Johnson, 2004). Other physical effects are cardiovascular problems, obesity and frequent

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