Westward Expansion Analysis

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Through the first half of this semester I have examined the undeniable truths of how Westward Expansion has affected Indians. It has encouraged me even more so to explore both sides of the story. I did not know how horrible Indians lives were when the outsiders invaded their land. I have been enlightened through this material concerning the mental and physical aspects of the westward expansion. The poor treatment towards Indians are shown immensely through the removal, and the stripping of their culture. The outsiders came across the ocean, saw the land as a gold mine, and sought to establish the new world as their own. With little notice, Indians were expected to pack up everything and leave. Sometimes they were not able to even pack all…show more content…
“His legs wobbled as he tried to stand but could not. The soldiers beat him harder with the whip to make him get up.” Beyond being rushed out of their homes, they had to endure through hazardous and sometimes fatal conditions. Indians who were slow to follow were severally punished like the man above. Other times, the ones that lagged behind were shot. I believe some Indians chose to react rather than give up their freedoms. Another reason rage increased was from the outsider’s unfaithful agreements. They proved to be ruthless and unrelenting. “From Yellow Wolf His Own Story” This story solidifies the malicious ways the outsiders used to solidify their unethical territorial domination. An ongoing battle broke out when Nez Perce Indians tried to escape the inevitable removal of their homes. Both sides decided to come to an accord. “We expected to be returned…show more content…
Many locations held their most precious and most passed on rituals. Without these religious ceremonies, the Indians would be spiritually depleted. The items used in these rituals saw a similar fate. Many items were made from buffalo, but they were killed by the masses at the hands of the outsiders. “As participants sing, pray, and meditate, they believe that the ritual sweat bath purges their impurities and brings both spiritual and physical health.” This was an impactful place that connected them with the world around them and the spiritual realm. “Alone on a Hilltop” is one of many stories that describes the correlation between objects and the spirit realm. “That smoke from the peace pipe, it goes straight up to the spirit world. But this is a two-way thing. Power flows down to us through that smoke, through the pipe stem.” The Indians lost connection to their rituals because the land resembled much more than a place to live. The land breathed life into the people who lived on its nourishing surface. The spiritual items utilized for the rituals most likely seemed like junk to the outsiders. The reservations in my opinion resembled the end to the beginning. Most of their ties to their ancestral traditions slowly diminished. For example, “The Sun Dance,” the most important religious event for the Sioux was seen unfit in the outsider’s eyes, and they did not want
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