Egyptian Nationalism Dbq

1592 Words7 Pages
This call for independence potentially put British assets in the region at risk, as well as, threatened access to the Suez Canal. However, perhaps most importantly, the colonial norm of wielding control over a colonized nation would be distinctly undermined at the prospect of self-determination and gaining independence from the British Empire. Consequently, despite Zaghlul’s demands being widely supported across Egypt, the British refused to recognize their calls for independence and refused to let them travel to Versailles to present their case before the convening peace conference. The Egyptian nationalists continued to use the norm of self-determination to justify their demands and gain more public recognition for their cause by using Wilson’s…show more content…
With Zaghlul returned from exile, and the Egyptian delegation granted the chance to travel to Versailles, as they initially intended, Zaghlul conducted interviews with foreign newspapers to present Egypt’s case, however, was met with little interest by other countries. The Egyptians became disenchanted with Wilson and any hope of support from the United States when the Americans formally recognized the British protectorate on April 22, 1919. Despite not having garnered international support for their cause, the Egyptian nationalists still tried to negotiate terms with the British for independence based on their right to self-determination. Between 1919 and 1922, attempts to secure a constitutional monarchy failed until, finally, in 1922, the British unilaterally decided to grant Egypt formal sovereignty, in fear of avoiding another revolution. By causing the notion of nationalism and the right to self-determination to disseminate in the Egyptian population, Egypt’s nationalist leaders helped trigger a revolution with enough political influence to, finally, provoke the British to grant Egypt its…show more content…
With two major revolutions, bolstered by prevalent public support, Egyptian nationalist movements were able to weaken and finally dissolve British occupation. The Egyptian independence movement used both peaceful and violent practical applications of the principle of self-determination. The Egyptian nationalist movements were popular amongst the local population due to the increasing anti-colonial sentiment and the distribution of nationalist propaganda around the country. This deeply embedded support within the population also triggered mass protests and uprisings against the British. Increasing frustrations with the foreign occupation and lack of governmental action also resulted in a political upheaval in Egypt. The nationalist leaders in Egypt used various means of destabilizing Britain’s control in the region justified by the principle of self-determination and the right to maintain national sovereignty without external impediments or
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