Egypt's Expulsion Of Hyksos

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Various factors may have combined to instigate the Egyptian’s expulsion of the Hyksos. The Hyksos occupation undermined the power of the Thebans, thus provoking their attack on the Hyksos. Furthermore, the expulsion of the Hyksos may have been provoked by the perceived illegitimacy of their claim to Egypt. Additionally, the Egyptian’s eventual adoption of Hyksos weaponry may have granted them the confidence to displace the Hyksos.
The expulsion of the Hyksos from Egypt may have been provoked by their subversion of the Egyptian’s power. This is evident in that the Hyksos gained influence in Egypt at the expense of the 13th Dynasty’s power. Evidence for this can be found in the throne’s loss of hereditary identity at this time, where the government
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The main evidence for this suggestion can be found in the first Kamose stela, where Kamose claims that “no man can settle down, when despoiled by the taxes of the Asiatics.” This subversion of the Egyptian’s power, as reflected in their tributes to the Hyksos, may have played a role in provoking their campaign against the foreign rulers. Accordingly, G. Steindorff and K. Seele state that the Theban “rulers grew increasingly restive under their ignominious status as tributaries to the hated Asiatic usurpers.” Thus, the combination of their aggrieved tribute to foreign rule and own waning power may have compelled the Theban kings to expel the Hyksos from Egypt.
Additionally, the expulsion of the Hyksos can be partly attributed to the perception that their right to the throne was illegitimate. As foreign rulers, the Egyptians most likely discerned the Hyksos rule as fraudulent in comparison to the hereditary claim of the Theban kings. Thus, the perceived illegitimacy of the Hyksos’ rule of northern Egypt most likely provoked their expulsion, as according to M. Hayes, they “had no right to claim any part of the Two
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After decades of foreign rule, a revival of national spirit in the 17th Dynasty was most likely provoked by their adoption of Hyksos weaponry. Evidence for this can be found within the tomb inscriptions of Ahmose, Son of Ebana, who accounts that he followed Ahmose I “abroad in his chariot.” This is the first known mention of the chariot by the Egyptians, believed to have been introduced by the Hyksos. Accordingly, P. Bradley asserts that their newfound “confidence to begin a war of liberation,” can be attributed to their adoption of Hyksos weaponry. Thus, the Theban’s adoption of Hyksos weaponry may have granted the Egyptians the confidence to expel the Hyksos.
There are various factors that may have contributed to the Egyptian’s expulsion of the Hyksos. The Hyksos expulsion may have been provoked by their subversion of the Theban’s power. They may have also been expelled due to their perceived fraudulent claim to the Egyptian throne. Furthermore, the Egyptian’s adoption of Hyksos weaponry may have granted them the confidence to expel the
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