Electoral College Voting Process Analysis

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Over the years we have used electoral college to determine our presidents. Currently our system is for who ever gets the majority vote in each state gets all of that state’s electoral votes. Because of this system, there have four been presidents who actually lost the popular vote but still won the presidency. Obviously this system is flawed. There have been plans discussed to replace it. One is the Proportional Plan, the other is the District plan. The Proportional plan is the best plan for the most accurate representation of what the people want. In the Proportional Plan the amount of electoral votes each candidate gets is determined by the popular vote percentages. For example if in a state 60% of the people vote for candidate A and 40% vote for candidate B then 60% of the electoral votes should go to candidate A and 40% should go to candidate B. In our current plan 100% of the votes would go to candidate A, which isn’t what the people in that state voted for. In the District Plan the electoral votes are determined by both the overall popular vote and also each district’s popular vote.…show more content…
This would not be good for many reasons. The main reason is that without the electoral college the smaller states would be highly unrepresented. For example California 's population as of 2015 was 39.1 million whereas Vermont’s in the same year was 626,042. California is over 62 times larger than Vermont. In the electoral college, however, California has 55 representatives and Vermont has 3, meaning that California only has about 18 times more representation. This encourages presidential candidates to not only focus on the big states during their campaigns, as to increase their chance of being elected. Another problem with getting rid of the electoral vote is that maybe the population vote won’t be entirely correct. This could be caused by flawed ballots or a technology

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