What Role Did Elizabeth Cady Stanton Play In Women's Rights Movement

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Women had always been considered lesser than man, and had few rights compared to men. They were expected to stay home and nurture the family. In 1848, many women refused to allow their rights to be “compromised” and held the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York. One of these women was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She played a huge role in the women’s rights movement and became one of its founders. Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s refusal to compromise on Women’s Rights inspired many other women to follow her example and led to an important change in the history of the United States, and that is suffrage for women. Throughout history, women tended to keep getting less and less rights. Roman women had almost as many rights as men, and had many of the rights that women in the seventeenth century were denied. Married women had the right to enter into contracts and own and dispose of property, as well as having certain limited rights. In the thirteenth century, the Cult of…show more content…
In 1840, she and her new husband went to an anti-slavery convention in London, where she was forced to sit in the back with the other women. The male organizers believed that women could only distract from the subject of the abolition of slavery by bringing up women’s rights. Lucretia Mott, another woman at the convention, met Stanton. The two women felt a large degree of moral conflict when women had no voice at the conference. They formed a friendship that led the way through the women’s rights movement. This refusal to compromise led to the Seneca Falls Convention. The Seneca Falls Convention on July nineteenth and twentieth, 1848, in Seneca Falls, New York, was the first women’s rights convention in North America. It was a two day day convention organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, and about three hundred people attended. The people who came discussed the “social, civil, and religious conditions and rights of women,” as well as their political
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