Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Last Speech Analysis

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“We hold these truths to be self evident: that all men are created equal.” This phrase, though written in 1776, was not followed until August 18, 1920. After 144 years, women received the right to vote because of the many women who fought to put an end to the injustices against them. “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions” and “Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton were two remarkable essays written in defense of women's rights. Although these speeches were written by the same author, there are many differences in their writing style and technique. Stantons beliefs in women's rights never altered but her confidence, audience, emotional appeal, and the organization of her speeches did.
Stantons tone varies tremendously between her
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Stanton's speeches did not cause an immediate change in the views of men in America but it started a revolution and made a difference. “Declarations of Sentiments and Resolutions” is “arguably the most significant document to call for the advancement of women in nineteenth-century America” (Knight). Despite the fact that women didn’t retain the right to vote until 72 years later, Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments was the first to publicize the issues that would be on the forefront of women's struggle to gain equality (Knight). Along with Stanton's “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, “Solitude of Self” made an enormous impact on the fight for women's equality. “The speech was a success with both the House and the Senate committees. The Senate committee wrote a favorable majority report about the speech and the House committee requested 10,000 copies of the speech be made for distribution throughout the country” (Campbell, Man Cannot Speak 2:371 – 72) (Kiss 9). Stanton’s speech left such a large impact on the men in those committees that they acted on the messages in her speech. Stanton greatly impacted the fight for women’s
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