Emancipation Proclamation Dbq

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September 22 marks if Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, in which he declared that as of January 1, 1863, all slaves in states in rebellion against the Union will be forever free. President Lincoln once said in his speech,”If the slavers were not wrong, nothing had wrong.” The problem was when he saw the time when he was the lawyer that the Constitution of protecting slavers in United States had already existed, he went on the struggling throughout the 1800s and 1900s the North were not the majority that the Emancipation should be goal of the Union. And actually there were fears that the soldiers realized even he could not get out to a congressional law that he could possibly created on his comment sheet from his war power, …show more content…

“The proclamation, as law, either is valid or is not valid. I f it is not valid, it needs no retraction. If it is valid, it is irrevocable” In this speech, Lincoln contend the validity, the organization for slavery cannot be formed nor built. He mentioned the limitations of the proclamation. The last version of his proclamation covered all parts of Arkansas, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, and parts of Louisiana and Virginia. There’s a condition given, Citizens should avoid violence and if capable, they could join the military. In 1865, thousands of African Americans had joined the U.S the army to fight the Confederacy, which was made effective during the …show more content…

Lincoln’s statement made newly freed slaves to join the Union army engaging aggression with their former masters. Sanctioning the work of African Americans as soldiers, not just laborers, for the army, paved the way for the creation of African American regiments for the Union army. Initially composed of emancipated slaves, such regiments would also come to include free African Americans from the North. These regiments remained segregated, but their creation meant that Lincoln had formed official channels through which African Americans could serve the Union. Thus, the opportunity of citizenship as well as freedom for African Americans, Lincoln had opened. The Emancipation Proclamation signing was done silently in contrast to its open and explicit effect on the war, as well as on the lives of millions of African

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