English And The Colonies: British Pre-Revolutionary War

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There were many events that led to the rapid change in ideas that the Colonies were more British pre-revolutionary war. The want for more land played a big role between the English and the British colonies. With the arrival of the English to the Native Americans, the English main focus was to displace the Native Americans and take over their land. With an unstable economy, left it easy for English to take over the land, leaving it hard for Native Americans. Many new challenges for the Native Americans soon followed the arrival of the English. In the early arrival of the English, there was an extreme competitive economic viewpoint. Unaware of the English’s’ intentions, the Native Americans did everything the English told them too. However,…show more content…
However, disputes between the English and the Colonies began to emerge. With the idea to take over the land, the English began to expand. First English began by taking control of the slave trade. With the new discoveries of tobacco and rice, there was an increasing demand for plantation labor. Slavery soon became related to race and there was a vast gap between whites and blacks. Tension soon erupted in the Empire. The Glorious revolution, inspired the colonist to challenge the English. There was a concern about social and political change. Soon enough, social class in America began to become more distinct over time. People were part of the upper, middle or lower class. These classes were clearly distinct, because each class had different rights. The colonies soon divided themselves from the Americans. They realized that there was a demographic diversity, regional diversity, and class conflict. Soon there were conflicts over Indian alliances. The relationship between the French and Native Americans became better. They collided together to fight off the…show more content…
Anger was directed to the imperial agents, parliament, and then the king. They questioned who had authority over the colonies. The outbreak of the began on 1775, and the British Surrendered Fort Ticonderoga to the Colonist. British troops were sent to the Colonies, but the colonies had the advantage. Americans were fighting on their land, and didn’t have to ship equipment across the oceans. The war eventually died out. In 1788, the British shifted their focus to the South, with the hope to take advantage of the tensions with
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