Epiphany In Heart Of Darkness

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Is it really an authentic discovery unless theres an epiphany? William Shakespeare who composed “The Tempest” and Joseph Conrad who composed “Heart Of Darkness” have conveyed how discoveries shaped by epiphanies can lead us too have emotional and intellectual change in values, ideas, understanding of our world and can have a transformative impact on an individual. In the Tempest, Shakespeare uses complex characterisation of Caliban and Prospero and their conflicting master-slave relationship as a vehicle to express the theme of colonialism. Through the overpowering dialogue that Prospero displays towards Caliban when he first discovers the island, it is clear that he holds no value or respect for Caliban as he states that when he arrived…show more content…
Ultimately, through the complex characterisation of Caliban, Shakespeare creates an oft-ignored and subjugated character of whom embodies the world of colonisation, one of the many victims of colonial rule and exploitation caused by Prospero’s insolence and de-humanising values. However, Caliban also represents the force that strikes back on the coloniser, which is evident through his epiphany which symbolises his authentic discovery of his changed, renewed sense of self-value as he calls into question his contempt for Prospero by coming to understand the un-realistic world that he has been a slave too, by Prospero, which…show more content…
Marlow initially approaches the opportunity with a pessimistic view of civilisation, yet a hope is retained once he establishes a belief that Kurtz shares his moral values about colonialism and the ethical treatment of others which is evident through the dialogue “Each station should be like a beacon on the road towards better things, a centre for trade of course, but also for humanising, improving, instructing”. However, this is initially challenged upon his first encounter with the natives, who he describes “They were nothing earthly now, nothing black shadows of disease.” The connotations of ‘black’, accompanied by the repetition of ‘nothing’, emphasise Marlowe’s horror upon being confronted with the epiphany that the heart of colonialism is not fuelled by the idea of civilisation, but rather then stemming from human greed. This is further reflected in Kurtz revelations prior to his death, as his discovery of his inhumane treatment of the natives results in great inner turmoil. His struggle is represented when he cries “Oh, but i will wring your heart yet!” at the “invisible wilderness”. The personification of the wild jungle illustrates Kurtz’s delusional struggle between succumbing to the innate desire to
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