Erikson's Psychosocial Theory Of Development

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Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development analyses the influence of independent factors, society and parents on development of personality from infanthood to adulthood. Corresponding to Erikson’s theory, every individual has to progress through a sequence of eight interconnected stages over the complete life cycle. The eight stages consist of: Stage 1 – from Birth-2 years of age (Infancy) Trust vs. Mistrust This first stage focuses on the infant’s primary needs being fulfilled by the parent/s and this communication provoking either trust or mistrust. Erikson defines trust “as a fundamental and necessary sense of an individual’s self-worth”. The infant relies on the parents but particularly the mother, for nourishment and happiness.…show more content…
The capability to determine an occupational or educational identity is satisfying. During the late stages of adolescence, the individual develops an awareness of their sexual identity. The individual contemplates what kind of roles they will portray as an adult as they transition from childhood to young adulthood. In the beginning, they are prone to encounter a little role disorientation—varied feelings and ideas about the definitive extent to which they will belong into the community—and they might explore with a mix of varying activities and behaviours (e.g. associating with specific religious or political…show more content…
When an individual provides assistance to others or to society during this stage, possibly by working towards improving society or by providing for his/her own family, a sense of gratification—a sense of achievement and productivity—is the outcome. In comparison, an individual who is selfish, unwilling or unfit to assist the community progress onward arises feelings of stagnancy—a resentment of the corresponding absence of productiveness. Stage 8 – from 65 years of age-Death (Late Adulthood) Integrity vs. Despair During this stage, the individual at senior age tends to decrease in productivity and focuses on living as a retired person and explore this change in living. They reminisce over the things they have accomplished and are capable to form feelings of integrity if they view themselves as having spent their life as successful. However, if they feel that they didn’t achieve their goals or if they view their life as unproductive, they will become disappointed with life and will instead form feelings of despair, which can then contribute to developing hopelessness and depression. This stage can arise out of order if a person feels they sense their life is imminently ending (e.g. after discovering a terminal illness diagnosis such as end-stage
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