Hemingway's Femme Fatale

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Ernest Hemingway 's short poems set him apart from the rest of the twentieth century literary crowd. His dramatic life serves as his primary source of inspiration for his greatest pieces of art. Living in the twentieth century, Hemingway 's poetry got its unique opportunity to flourish taking advantage of the freedom of expression, something that opposed to the previous century. By making the smart choice of detecting the best of this literary era, Hemingway found a way of expressing himself in the simplest way possible. By representing himself in his literary work, he became recognizable and adored by the younger population. He did not exactly poured himself on a piece of paper, considering the fact that he was not the type of person who praised…show more content…
Her name is Margo Macomber, who is characterized by all the adjectives Ernest uses to describe the admirable kind of women 'femme fatale ', even murderous. She is practically in control of her husband 's life, that she leaves a trademark in this novel. Margo Macomber is devious, brave, strong, appealing, beautiful (even compared to Africa), opportunistic, unfaithful, deceitful, gracious, that differs from man only by her sex. Instead of taking the role of subservient wife, she takes initiative and makes a bold move into killing her coward of a husband when she felt even for a second threatened by leaving the position of a controlling bitch. Furthermore in his novel "Hills Like White Elephants", Hemingway portrays young, innocent girl, unaware of the dangers of this modern society. She gets pregnant by a 'macho man ' who is ignorant of the situation, forcing her to get an abortion. Through his character, Hemingway makes us aware of the concepts of cynicism, ignorance and masculinity. Maybe this is an introspective of Hemingway 's madness? He is consumed with anger toward women, that he would even leave an innocent young girl out in a world; all alone with an innocent fetus on the…show more content…
He might have felt suffocated from his surroundings and took a step to tell the readers what lies deep down inside his dark soul. Why in the twentieth century, in that time of changes, inventions, revolutions were made so many changes, but not one about the female sex? Why could not Hemingway resist the urge to humiliate women in public, when they were already put aside in the previous centuries? Couldn 't he pick up something else to mock? One man 's act cannot change the world, but it could be a start. We can conclude that his novels are associated with masculinity and the repression of femininity. Problems about the sexes prevail in his short stories, novels, poetry, which are widely known. For Hemingway women serve men for pleasure, not for being maternal, which represents his dark past i.e. his own nightmares. He considers that he can achieve his goal and to make his wishes come true by diminishing women in general. He enjoys company of man, and he 's not opposed to relations of the same gender, because both sexes have different perspective of life, and what is good for one sex is not for the other etc. Why the author takes his woman to express through her when she is in a way "smaller" than him? Why can 't he just accept the fact that we are all human beings, who has the same habits, the same necessities? Is it too hard to accept the reality as it is?
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