Corruption In Sudan

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“A lie cannot live,” this quote once said by a great leader, Martin Luther King, proves that corrupt countries or organizations do not live but decay. However, this is not the case in Sudan as the corruption rate has increased in the last few years making Sudan a victim of corruption. Every victim has a story and today I will be telling you about Sudan’s story. Despite being almost 60 years since Sudan’s independence, it has yet not achieved its full potential. The reason behind this is that Sudan is unfortunately corrupted. In fact, Sudan is the third most corrupted country in the world, according to Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index. After Sudan’s independence in 1956, the fight to gain power between the many…show more content…
As the presidential elections of April, Sudan’s first multiparty elections in 24 years have exhibited. Despite the international concerns for intimidation and fraud, Al-Bashir was re-elected with 68% of the votes. Various opposition groups boycotted the elections and other participating parties later announced they would not recognize the election results alleging fraud and vote rigging. In the run-up to the elections, many candidates apparently withdrew their candidacies in favour of the NCP candidates in exchange for cash, or other material resources or…show more content…
These impacts may not mean much compared to the country’s economic and political instability combined with an underdeveloped framework and a lack of a qualified workforce. However, there is evidence that Sudan’s private sector faces major challenges to grow and diversify due to the superior treatment given to companies linked to the ruling elite. The International Crisis Group (2011) highlighted how support exercises a negative impact on competition. According to the report, international companies connected to Islamist companies are often awarded government contracts for major construction projects (e.g. Merowe Dam, roads, bridges) without following proper procurement rules. The fact that such companies will then sub-contract to local companies which are also connected to the ruling party, makes matters worse. Many small and recently established companies failed and were forced to shut down due to unfair competition from party-affiliated
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