The Broken Window Theory

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The broken- windows theory was developed in 1982 by criminologists James Q. Wilson and George Keeling. The meaning behind this theory is that crime is the inevitable result of disorder. “If a window is broken and left unrepaired, people walking by will conclude that no one cares, and no is in charge (Lorenz, pg.248).” Therefore; that broken window or minor infraction will convey a message of encouragement to criminals that there is less social control, making it safe to commit more serious offenses and avoid being caught (Bell, 2015). Zero-tolerance policies can be linked to the broken window theory or to social control theories. The zero tolerance policies were first established and implemented to be a legal deterrent in narcotics trafficking…show more content…
In 1994, the Clinton administration signed the Gun Free Schools Act due to the increased public concern and outrage for the mass shootings that were taking place within our public- school system. The zero tolerance policies included the emphasis on keeping firearms off our school campuses as well as anything that could be considered disruptive or unsafe to the learning environment including illegal drugs, over-the- counter medications, and any other prohibited behaviors (APA Task Force, 2006). The National Center for Educational Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported in the 1990s that 94% of schools throughout our nation had policies in place for firearms, 87% for alcohol, 88% for drugs, and 79% for violent behavior (Stinchcomb, Bazemore, & Riestenberg,…show more content…
The key assumption of the above punishments would be a result of a safer climate and/or classroom experience for all children as well as sending a strong deterrent message to all other students. (APA Task Force, 2008; Gregory & Cornell, 2009). But in fact it has been established that non-attendance due to the punishments listed above can lead to negative child well-being outcomes such as; poor academic performance, low school attachments, delinquency, drug use, sexual promiscuity, and eventual school dropout which ultimately does not promote a safe and welcoming classroom experience for all children (Sutphen, R., D., Ford, J., P., Flaherty, C.,
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