Essay On Brutality Of Indifference

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Brutality of Indifference There are an estimated 250,000 child soldiers in the world today that are fighting to survive and get through their lives every day. There were approximately 1.5 million child deaths in the holocaust. Ishmael Beah and Elie Weisel are both foreigners who struggled in life and struggle trying to understand why the world is so indifferent. Ishmael Beah is the author of the memoir A Long Way Gone and therefore he went through the treacherous past of being a child soldier in Africa. Elie Wiesel performed the speech “The Perils of Indifference” and explained his aversion for people who were not helping others in need. These authors showed how indifference in the world takes away humanity and takes away the basic rights of every human being. Both authors hope to use their literature to change how people see the victims of brutality around…show more content…
As a younger person, he went through an incredibly racist and segregated time in Nazi Germany during the holocaust and was forced to do labor and live on starvation rations. This made him realize that because of America’s indifference, he was at high risk for dying. He states in “The Perils of Indifference” that, “to be indifferent to that suffering is what makes the human being inhuman,” (Weisel). Basically this can be interpreted to show why the author thinks every human should understand and act on their basic human emotion of compassion and sympathy. He explains his theory on how humans become inhuman and this quote could easily convince another person to become more active to make a difference. The obvious activist voice in these paragraphs show how much Elie wanted to change how people ignored others. Elie Wiesel wrote these passages to explain his point about not being indifferent, because to him, nothing could stifle progress as much as not
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