The Rise Of Vicy: The French Resistance Movement

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The surrender of France in June 1940, was a major blow to many French people in terms of their pride. The German Nazis succeeded in what they were attempting to do, to destroy France and bring it to its knees. The German’s use of the speed and severity of Blitzkrieg had shocked the French people, since they were very dependant on their Maginot Line. The devastating part is that Vichy, a state in France, had betrayed and forgotten its loyalty to its mother country. Pétain, governor of Vichy, released a statement on the 30th of October 1940 after he met and shook hands with Hitler in Montoire. He established that Vichy, France would collaborate with the Germans and proposed that they should be allied with them.The German Army inspired many French…show more content…
This is because there were many different branches of the resistance who wanted to get rid of the Axis Powers which initially included Germany, Italy and Japan. Some took direct orders from the SOE, the Special Operation Executive from Britain which was ordered by Winston Churchill, while others were communist resistances. Some were loyal to de Gaulle while others fought for independence and other reasons. The first resistance movements were in the north such as the OCM, the Organisation Civile et Militaire. Their main task was to link up with the French Resistance to threaten the Germans in the countries they had occupied.Sadly, the French resistance did not have a good start. In May of 1941, the first SOE agent was dropped into northern France to help with the resistance. By June of 1941, the resistance was more organized than before and its structure was more…show more content…
This specific operation led to the tremendous growth of the Resistance. Politics took a back step while French communists took a step forward and gained a reputation for being aggressive and successful resistance fighters. Many French people bravely joined in due to the losing support for Vichy government. In addition, many in the south were angered by the mandatory labour service that had been brought in by the Germans. More and more French citizens continued to join the resistance thus strengthening it. Moreover the French Resistance had many relationships with foreign countries, especially with Great Britain who helped train many soldiers, which in return helped this group to rise up to the surface. By 1944, there were about 100,000 resistant members in the various groups and within a 10-month period, the French Resistance became very popular that it gained 60,000 members. The outcome was very pleasing to France, because even though they knew the possible outcome if they were to fail to reach their goal, they were very persistent and never gave up. This is one of the reasons why the French Resistance survived and helped contribute to the liberation of France from the tight grips of the
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