Essay On Friar Is Responsible For The Deaths Of Romeo And Juliet

761 Words4 Pages

“An obsession is a way for damaged people to damage themselves more.” - Mark Rarrowcliffe. Obsessed people seemingly will do anything for their obsession, resulting in hasty and reckless decisions. In general, impulsive decisions lead towards people making risky choices. Often impetuous decisions don’t take into consideration the long term consequences of actions. In Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, a long lasting feud between two families erupt into bloodshed, leaving a young, lovesick Romeo Montague to instantly fall in love with Juliet Capulet. The conflict between the two families means their love must be kept in secret, ultimately resulting in the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet. Although some may say Friar Lawrence is most to …show more content…

Friar Lawrence, through his subversive acts, is to blame for the deaths. The Friar is presented as a wise man whom Romeo and Juliet trust and rely on for help through conflict. In Shakespeares’ play, Romeo asks Friar to marry him and Juliet. Friar, anxious to help, agrees to marry them. “In one respect I’ll thy assistant be, / For this alliance may so happy prove, / To turn your households rancor to pure love.” (2.3. L 90-92) This example shows Friar responding to Romeos’ request to marry him and Juliet. He is agreeing to marry them, though he also knew the marriage was too soon, and keeping it secret could result in further conflict. Even though he encouraged this dishonest behavior, his intentions were for the best interest for Romeo …show more content…

In the play, Romeo is so desperate to find someone to love for their beauty, and not their personality. At a party, Romeo meets Juliet and he instantly falls in love with her. Later on in the play, Romeo goes to Friar to ask him to wed Romeo and Juliet. Friar then responds with, “Young men’s love then lies / Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.” (2.3. L 67-68) This quote suggests that Romeo never truly encounters feelings toward Juliet, but is consumed by her beautiful looks. Not only is Romeo most to blame because of his superficial obsession with Juliet, but also because of his impulsive decisions. After Juliet and Romeo get married, Juliet is faced with a conflict. Her father, Lord Capulet, is making Juliet marry Paris. In order to evade the marriage, she drinks a vile of poison given to her by Friar Lawrence, and according to Friar, she will wake up in a few days. Romeo is to meet Juliet at her tomb and wake her, leaving them two to run off together. At the final part of the plan, Romeo goes to wake Juliet, but she is not waking up. “Thou art not conquered; beauty's ensign yet / Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, / And death's pale flag is not advanced there.” (5.3. L 94-96) This quote proposes that Romeo notices signs of life in Juliet, since her lips are still colorful, as well as her

Open Document